INTEGRATIONALISM

"all things in existence are physiologically connected"

John Conyers of Detroit on Human Labor

“The End of Work” published in 1995. by Jeremy Rifkin, “President of the Foundation on Economic Trends and the bestselling author of nineteen books on the impact of scientific and technological changes on the economy, the workforce, society, and the environment.”

My elder frat brother and home town hero made some grand political philosophy alignments with Rifkin. Its important considering the news yesterday that the city that birthed us both is Bankrupt, well he was actually born in Highland Park, MI which is a city surrounded by Detroit that has always been on the brink of financial catastrophe but isn’t bankrupt. How’d that happen?

The notion that we can just shorten the work load of the few people working today is not very progressive at all, for someone that subscribes to the progressive moniker that the Democratic Party touts in its modern campaigns. Specific to the structural unemployment technoprogressivism, value isn’t distributed well. of When Hewlett-Packard or Facebook acquires companies to grow its ability to provide a valuable social network its hires the staff at those firms for being effective and efficient. Sometimes they’ve even warranted paying a team of 20 people 1,000,000,000 US Dollars.

UntitledIf I were to root-cause the labor gap that Rep. Conyers is referencing, I’d start by looking at the value that workers are actually creating and where they are deriving it from. While much thinking specific to policy and liberal artistic disciplines like rhetoric are based in linear thought, thinking around innovation cannot be. It is exponential, or rather, an extension of previous developments and influences. Formal jobs are a great tool for deploying human talent, but they aren’t the only tool anymore and shouldn’t acknowledged as such.https://i0.wp.com/rt.com/files/usa/news/detroit-city-council-million-282/detroit-carries-sign-2012.si.jpg

A congressman with as little to lose as Rep. Conyers at 84 years old should be looking to usher in new measures to indemnify the people of his district and others for their toiling. Logic: If all innovations are technological (methodological, software, hardware) – and technological growth is exponential – and exponential growth is rooted in influences – and influencers are individuals or institutions – then we should be looking at way to indemnify the influencers. This incentivizes people to participate well in their respective professions regardless of what color collar they’ll wear. Use the #BigData.

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4 Comments»

  Eric Fortune wrote @

this quote is from the book “The End of Work” published in 1995. by Jeremy Rifkin, “President of the Foundation on Economic Trends and the bestselling author of nineteen books on the impact of scientific and technological changes on the economy, the workforce, society, and the environment.”

Other more recent books on Technological Unemployment are:
-“Lights in the Tunnel” by Martin Ford
-“Race Against the Machine” by two prestigious MIT professors
-“Robots, will steal your job. But that’s ok” by Federico Pistono

  Eric Fortune wrote @

another relevant quote:

“If one machine can cut necessary human labor by half, why make half of the workforce redundant, rather than employing the same number for half the time? Why not take advantage of automation to reduce the average working week from 40 hours to 30, and then to 20, and then to ten, with each diminishing block of labor time counting as a full time job? This would be possible if the gains from automation were not mostly seized by the rich and powerful, but were distributed fairly instead.

Rather than try to repel the advance of the machine, which is all that the Luddites could imagine, we should prepare for a future of more leisure, which automation makes possible. But, to do that, we first need a revolution in social thinking.
~Lord Skidelsky, Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Warwick

http://www.skidelskyr.com/site/article/the-rise-of-the-robots/

  Eric fortune wrote @

If the quote in the image is from “the end of work” by Jeremy Rifkin. And “the end of work” was published in 1995. How is it possible that the quote be aligned with Rifkin “after the news yesterday”? It appears the quote referenced was at least 18 years ago, and definitely not after the recent news of Detroit.

  JFKII wrote @

You are correct, I’ll change the language. I’m only looking to show that Conyers aligns with this message, which I dont think has any real value in our system of growth. You’ll see an update soon.


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